Dissolute behavior on a bike


“The bicycle riders drank much wine, and were burned and browned by the sun. They did not take the race seriously except among themselves.”
— Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises, 1926

This is getting to be a habit. And it has to stop.
The past three weekends
have involved bicycling and the support of local enterprises that produce adult beverages.

Deep Ellum Brewing Co., Dallas

Deep Ellum Brewing Co., Dallas

This dissolute behavior began on Saturday, Aug. 17, when I and a couple of neighbors on Fort Worth’s near south side met some other cyclists at a nearby bakery and rode to a relatively new microbrewery, Martin House, to sample its wares.
The drill at Martin House Brewing Co., as at other microbreweries I’ve visited, is $10 for a glass with the brewery’s logo and three pours of whatever is on tap.
It’s not a good idea, however, to drink the full complement and then get back onto a bike, especially when the temperature is hovering around 100 degrees. So says my wife.
The next weekend included a family wedding in Fort Worth on Aug. 24. Part of the program of festivities that day was a tour of Firestone & Robertson Distilling Co., where the bridegroom works, on the near south side.
At the rehearsal dinner the night before, I had met a young urban planner from the groom’s side of the family who had come from Milwaukee to attend the wedding.
Copper pot still, Firestone & Robertson Distilling Co., Fort Worth, 2013

Copper pot still, Firestone & Robertson Distilling Co., Fort Worth, 2013

He happened to be a cyclist and wondered about the possibility of a bike ride the next morning. Easily arranged, I said. I picked him up at his downtown hotel, brought him to our house, put him on one of my touring bikes, and off we went on an 18-mile ramble around Fort Worth, which ended at the Firestone & Robertson Distillery.
Firestone & Robertson currently produces a blend of whiskeys gathered from throughout the United States and marketed with the brand name TX.
The distillery is also making its own bourbon, aging in barrels on racks in a gallery above the distillery’s ground floor. The first batches of bourbon will have to mellow for another 18 months or so before bottling and distribution.
We, of course, got to sample the blended whiskey already on the market. Very, very nice! But perhaps not good preparation for the wedding and the open-bar reception that evening.
Barrels of aging bourbon at Firestone & Robertson Distilling Co., Fort Worth

Barrels of aging bourbon at Firestone & Robertson Distilling Co., Fort Worth

The third, and latest, sampling of locally made adult beverages was on the Saturday of Labor Day weekend in Dallas.
Some Dallas-area cyclists whom a neighbor and I had met during our visit to the Martin House Brewery had invited us to come to Dallas to take in a coffee shop and a couple of microbreweries.
So we rode the Trinity Railway Express to Dallas, along with our bikes, hooked up in downtown Dallas with our new cycling friends and set off, first to the artsy Oak Cliff neighborhood in south Dallas for some coffee at Oak Cliff Coffee Roasters, a local hangout.
A barista makes a latte at Oak Cliff Coffee Roasters, Dallas

A barista makes a latte at Oak Cliff Coffee Roasters, Dallas

Fortified with strong java, we set out to sample another type of brew at the Deep Ellum Brewing Co., just north of downtown Dallas, and then onto the Community Beer Co., a short ride from Victory Station at the American Airlines Center, where we caught the train back to Fort Worth.
It was an altogether pleasing bit of urban cycling, although Dallas is not yet as bike-friendly as Fort Worth. Dallas has a very good mass transit system and Fort Worth an excellent network of bike trails, a bike-sharing program and designated bike lanes on city streets.
It’s too bad that the two cities, about 30 miles apart, cannot have both in equal measure.
Thus ended the cycle of dissolute weekends. It won’t happen again this weekend. I promise. I’m getting too old for this stuff.

Art exhibit at Community Beer Co., Dallas

Art exhibit at Community Beer Co., Dallas

My bike on the bridge between Oak Cliff and downtown Dallas, 2013

My bike on the bridge between Oak Cliff and downtown Dallas, 2013

Fellow cyclists Jeff Sailer, center, and Scott Nishimura, right,  at Oak Cliff Coffee roasters

Fellow cyclists Jeff Sailer, center, and Scott Nishimura, right, at Oak Cliff Coffee roasters

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4 Comments

Filed under Americana, Cool stuff, Texana, Urban cycling

4 responses to “Dissolute behavior on a bike

  1. ridingtherims

    Some really nice images of the breweries, Jim.

  2. Jeffery Sailer

    How about a FW double tour brewery tour in October ?
    Bike Friendly Oak Cliff will also be doing a Lee Harvey Oswald Historical Bike tour in November. Look for it on a BATT (FB Event).
    Thanks Jim,Scott and Steve for the stories.

    • Jeff,
      I, and probably Scott and perhaps some other neighbors, would be open to some more bike tours in your area. Both the brewery tour and the Lee Harvey Oswald tour sound interesting. By the way, there will be a bike swap meet Oct. 13 at Rahr’s . It has become an annual fall event. But, unfortunately for Dallas cyclists, it is on a Sunday, beginning at 9 a.m., and the TRE doesn’t run on Sundays. Sorry for the tardy reply. I haven’t been very active on my blog lately.
      Jim

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